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PARTITA IVA: HOW TO WORK AS A FREELANCER IN ITALY

career change mid-career growth show midlife career development Dec 09, 2022
PARTITA IVA: HOW TO WORK AS A FREELANCER IN ITALY

Are you considering opening your partita IVA in Italy to work as a freelancer?

In this post, you'll learn: 

• What is the first step to becoming a solopreneur in Italy.
• Is it fundamental to hire a commercialista to open a partita IVA.
• Why is it important to pay the social contribution as a freelancer.

When it comes to freelancing in Italy, there is a strategy that you can apply in your career, that is, having your partita IVA.
This is your Italian solopreneur tax number, and you'll need it to work, especially on business-to-business, if you want to work as a consultant with people around the world or in Europe.
So whether you're issuing invoices to companies or people, the partita IVA is necessary if you are formally freelancing. 
Here is my personal experience: in 2019, I left a stable corporate job to start a master's degree. Then I started a career coaching business in Italy. I opened a partita IVA to invoice clients and pay the corresponding taxes. 
I would advise you, especially if you're not very keen on the Italian language, to hire a commercialista. It's a mixture of a lawyer and a certified accountant. They are fundamental in your business management, taking care of your accounting books, etc. 
Look for information or at least book a consultation with a commercialista before moving on because this is the accredited person that can advise you on the best tax regime for you, which are the existing tax regimes and how it will work out better for you.
In my case at CL4IR, I work as a career coach, consultant, and instructor, teaching career strategies to international women.
So I'm a services provider and also a digital training seller. 
I can also freelance services to companies and invoice them. This is my business arrangement!
Opening a partita IVA in Italy is possible if you're legally registered as a country resident, even if your citizenship is non-European - I have dual citizenship. Still, when I opened mine, I was Brazilian. 
Formalizing your business and professional activities is essential since you also access the pension fund. It's a way to contribute to your retirement plan. 
It sucks to pay the social contribution in advance, but it's crucial for your future. Keep your contributions in place, then when you decide to retire, according to the regulations and the laws here in Italy or other places - there are agreements between countries - then it's easier for you to retire. 
Another critical aspect, especially for entrepreneurs and women that want to grow their businesses, is that Europe is launching several programs to boost female entrepreneurship.
So with your partita IVA, you can apply for those programs and ask for funds and discount interest rates.
This is especially important because we want to build our small empires. We want to be at service to other people. 
Let's rock, ladies!

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